Inside, the building borrowed  from the best colonial examples to be found in the Rhode Island plantations.  All the rooms had large open fireplaces with gas logs, and their colonial mantels were  loaned to the State by their owners. 

The first floor contained a  state hall,  which through the left, one could enter a writing room and a ladies pallor. To the right of the state hall, was a reading room, an information bureau and a smoking pallor. The second floor contained four chamber room, an executive room, the commissioner office
and a colonial hall. Each floor had toilets, which the second floor was equipped with baths.

One of the highlights of the
building was a cut glass
chandelier that had been a
gift from Marie Antoinette to
Lafayette in 1826.

The Rhode Island building
was formally dedicated
June 1, 1904 with a brief ceremony
that began at 3pm.

On July 4, 1904, the Rhode
Island Building was purchased
by Mr. John Ringen, of St. Louis.

Apart from the sleeping quarters,
the entire building was devoted
to public use.

Please Click on
State Building That You Want to See.  Not Every Exhibit is Listed.
UNITED STATES
STATE BUILDINGS
RHODE  ISLAND
Lee  Gaskins'   AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
                   Web  Design and Art/Illustration   copyrighted  2008
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A section of the Executive Room.
The Rhode Island's building State Hall
Rhode Island's entry  faced north on Colonial Avenue; the site selected was  in the extreme southeast corner of the Exposition grounds, on high land, backed by a  beautiful grove of oaks and walnuts.  Adjoining to the east was
Indiana; to the west, Nevada.

Across the avenue  and was modeled  from the Stephen H. Smith mansion in the town of Lincoln. Thornton & Thornton of Providence, selected from sixteen sets of plans submitted in
open competition by Rhode Island architects. The supervising architects were Messrs. Mauran, Russell and Garden, of Saint Louis. The contractor was L. B. Wright of Saint Louis.

The Rhode Island Building imitated in cement the material of which the old Smith mansion is constructed— seam-faced granite" taken from the quarry on the estate.

The 101 by 61 foot building cost 20,300 dollars. An ogee gable was reproduced in colored staff to give the effect of the "seamed-face granite" taken from the quarry on the estate.  6,242.80 dollars of furnishings filled its interior.

The building was located on Colonial avenue, facing north; the site selected lying in the extreme southeast corner of the Exposition grounds, on high land, backed by a beautiful grove of oaks and walnuts and convenient with
respect to transportation, restaurant service and main entrance of the fairgrounds. Adjoining to the east was Indiana; to the west, Nevada. To the rear of the building sat the Inside Inn.



Rhode Island  was  well-represented  in the
Palaces of Horticulture,  Education,  Fish and Game, and Education and Social Economy. The work of the primary, secondary and normal public schools, and the various institutions under the control of the Board of State Charities and Corrections, constitute the displays in the Palace of Education and Social
Economy. There was a creditable showing in the Palaces of Agriculture
and Forestry, Fish and Game (including  lobster and clam exhibits).
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