Nebraska did not have an official building at the St. Louis  World's Fair, though the state did have  35,000 dollars in apparitions, they used the money as a  headquarters at the Palace of Agriculture's  Block 57,  on the main aisle, where the state commissioners established their pavilion   that included:  reception rooms, reading and writing  tables, post-office, check room, lavatories, and all the articles and conveniences found in the more elaborate state buildings on the grounds. The pavilion covered nearly 8,000 square feet of space, and was handsomely decorated with grains, grasses, and corn arranged in most
artistic form.

The principal exhibit made by Nebraska was in the Agriculture Department. There sheaf grain, grasses, corn, vine products, and all agricultural products were shown, including all varieties of field, sweet, flint, and pop corn.

Shown every half and hour in a small theater, there were free moving picture exhibitions illustrating the various resources of the state.

The unique idea of doing this by moving pictures and stereopticon views was hit upon by the president of the commission-Gurdon W. Wattles. The plan was early adopted by the commission, and during all of the summer of 1903 and in the spring of 1904 an expert photographer, under the direction of the secretary of the commission- H. G. Shedd and the various superintendents was engaged in taking suitable pictures for this exhibition.

"One of the most attractive moving pictures shown was that of the late President William McKinley, at the Trans-Mississippi Exposition in Omaha. The film of this picture, which is one of the very few moving pictures of the late president in existence, was kindly loaned to the Nebraska Commission by Frank A. Rinehart, of Omaha.

The Education Palace exhibit of Nebraska showed the work of schools from
kindergarten through the colleges and universities. It also made a fine
display of the work of women's clubs in literary and musical lines.

The state had a larger exhibit of corn than any State making an
exhibition of cereals. There were more than 57 varieties, running from
the little "Tom Thumb" ears of popcorn to mammoth ears of field corn.
One species of corn which attracted particular attention was the result
of grafting experiments, whereby several varieties of corn of various
colors and shades were made to grow on one cob. This variety was known
as the "Evolution Species."

Other  Nebraska exhibits  were found in the Palaces of  Horticulture,
and Mines buildings, including a huge  display of live stock to the Exposition stock shows.


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Lee  Gaskins'  AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
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