Maryland's  building was on Constitution Avenue, between West Virginia and Oklahoma. The structure  was a replica  the building that was created  by Maryland at the Charleston Exposition. The size of the building- 102 by 50 feet, and it cost 18,402.70 dollars. It was of a modern classic design. In plan it was a parallelogram, supported by six columns of the composite order 25 feet
high, carrying a cornice and balustrade above. The Maryland State arms
were the central feature over the main entrance.  It was two stories high and created  in the Italian Renaissance style. There was a terrace at the rear of the building in the wooded land from which a fine view of the Government Bird Cage could  be obtained.

The structure was dedicated on June 8.

Inside.  the classic feeling was maintained; on entering through the loggia one found an imposing hall 55 feet long by 25 feet high. The color scheme of this room was golden brown, with a lighter shade of the same for the vaulted ceiling. Portraits of great value, taken from the statehouse at Annapolis, as well as one of his eminence Cardinal Gibbons, lent an air of dignity. Other rooms on the ground
floor were: On the left a picture room, where a large number of framed
photographs of Maryland scenery, buildings, and objects of interest were
hung, and back of this a lunch room and pantry, for use on reception
days. At the other end of the building there was a drawing room, with a
room at the back which was used as a men's smoking room. A stairway led from this part of the building to the ladies' drawing-room.

The interior featured a large reception hall, showcasing a copy of Van Dyck's portrait of Henrietta Maria (wife of Charles the first),  from whom the State took its name. 


The second story, at the other end of the building, had a  room for  caretaker of the building-  Albert Jones,  Mrs. Parks Fisher, of Baltimore, dispensed hospitality
in true Maryland style.


At the Palace of  Mines and Metallurgy,  Maryland had  area of nearly 3,000 square feet of floor and showcased coal, building and decorative stones, ores, clays and clay products (including pottery, tile, terra cotta, fancy and common brick, fire brick, enameled brick, retorts and stove linings), limestones, sands,
cement rocks, flints, feldspars, marls, tripoli, barites, and  soapstone.

Besides an exhibit of canned goods, the state also had displays in the Palace of Agriculture.
Please Click on
State Building That You Want to See.  Not Every Exhibit is Listed.
UNITED STATES
STATE BUILDINGS
MARYLAND
Lee  Gaskins'  MEET ME AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
                   Web  Design and Art/Illustration   copyrighted  2008
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