Alaska or  "Seward's Folly"  as it was called between its purchase (1867) and statehood (1959), had a  group of buildings, just southwest of the
Administration building.  The buildings and exhibits cost 50,000  dollars,  and was  funded  by Congress. The main  two-storied structure, was 100 x 50  feet  and colonial in its style of architecture. Immense totem poles surrounded the buildings two  native houses at its sides. Some of these were carved by
the aborigines many years ago, while others have been recently retouched
and decorated by native artists brought here to the Fair. Blooming at the feet of the
giant totems were  wild flowers interspersed with shrubs and forest trees indigenous to the country.



















The native houses were  filled with the handiwork of the Alaskan and Eskimaus.  and comprised of costumes, utensils, ornaments and curios of all descriptions.

One item one could find inside was a 8 x 10 foot ceremonial robe made out of feathers from wild eagles.






















































































Please Click on
State Building That You Want to See.  Not Every Exhibit is Listed.
UNITED STATES
STATE BUILDINGS
ALASKA
Lee  Gaskins'   AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
                   Web  Design and Art/Illustration   copyrighted  2008

An important exhibit was  a large collection of minerals: gold nuggets, both in quartz and placer, silver, copper (including Alaskan Copper Company),  tin, lead and iron. Marble, coal and petroleum were also exhibited.

In addition, the Alaska exhibit  featured a grand display of  furs  (including the Simmon Fur Company), and fishes (especially salmon),   grasses, vegetables and berries (illustrating the future-state's production), and of course its ample  timber/forestry exhibit.  Marble, canned goods, furs, coal, oils, guano, vegetables and fruit, Indian basketry and curios, and mounted specimens of game and fish were showcased.

There was  an educational exhibit of  public school  work, and an art gallery filled with paintings by Alaskan artists.


The interior  of  the  Alaska Building.
A larger picture of  the Alaska  Building. Notice  the totem poles.
Exhibit of  the Treadwell Mining Output  from one  mine.  Each layer represented  annual output of  pure  gold. The amount  was three times  the  cost  of  the purchase of Alaska. 
One of the most impressive and significant exhibits was a gilded cube,
about 3 feet in diameter, representing the size of a block of gold worth
7,200,000  dollars  which was the amount paid by the United States to Russia for
Alaska, and beside it, enclosed in a brass railing; a gilded pyramid of
blocks representing the amount of gold taken each year since 1882 from
the Treadwell mine in Alaska. Aggregating 21,800,000 dollars, this sum was
three times the amount paid for Alaska taken from one mine.

An interesting exhibit of Alaskan ethnology included:  twenty totem poles, two native houses and one war canoe  which was located about the
building. The totem poles came from different places on Prince of Wales
Island and from two different tribes, includimg the  old village of Tuxekan.
Closeup  of  the Totem Poles.
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