Oklahoma's entry was a   Spanish style with a semi-Moorish-influenced red roof that was two stories high. The  76 by 70 foot building that cost 15,420 dollars. The front of the building was surrounded by two big verandas,  in the cloistered recesses porches could be found all sorts of chairs to rest the weary fairgoer. It sat next to the New York building.

Oklahoma cement was used in its exterior fabrication.

Inside, its fourteen rooms included, a large reception hall  with fine wood finishings separated two parlors.  The men's parlor contained a 12 foot table made from  a single piece of wood.  Displays of art and history  included  a series of portraits of  the  five Governors of the territory.  A few tables dated back to the era of Napoleon.

All the plaster, inside and out, used in the construction of the building was manufactured from Oklahoma gypsum.

A register was kept for the signatures of visitors.

Open to the public was a 600-seat restaurant.

It was dedicated May 23, 1904.

Oklahoma  Territory displayed noted  products in the Palaces of Agriculture,  and Mines. 

They also had a large exhibit in the Palace of Education; its 488 square feet  contained representative work from the kindergarten to the University of Oklahoma. All the seven colleges and preparatory schools supported by the territory were represented, and many of the ten institutions of higher learning supported by denominational and private enterprises.

























Please Click on
State Building That You Want to See.  Not Every Exhibit is Listed.
UNITED STATES
STATE BUILDINGS
OAKLAHOMA
Territory
Lee  Gaskins'   AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
                   Web  Design and Art/Illustration   copyrighted  2008
After the Fair, the  Oklahoma  building lodge was cut into sections and loaded onto a Rock Island train bound for El Reno.  Rock Island Elks officials lobbied for the building to be reassembled in  El Reno,  their hometown and it was opened in 1905. The building's  second floor contained a balcony, which was later sealed because of pigeon problems. The basement and stage area was added later.

Many still marvel at its  engineering, as the edifice appears  seamless.

In the Horticultural Department the exhibit covered 1,100 square feet of
floor space. The exhibit consisted of 250 jars of preserved fruits of
the various kinds produced in Oklahoma Territory, 200 bottles of Oklahoma grape wine, and about 400 plates of fresh fruits of the various kinds in their season. Four hundred and fifty bushels of the choicest apples were placed in cold storage in the fall of 1903 to keep the exhibit fresh.

The state's  mineral exhibit occupied 1,020 square feet in the Palace of Mines and Metallurgy. Here were shown 186 exhibits of sandstone, limestone, and other building stone, magnetite, brick (both burned and green), transparent selenite, and various others from Oklahoma Territory. It also contained salt, oil, and glass sand testing 96 per cent pure.
The Territory of Oklahoma's Educational  exhibit. in the Palace of Education.
A section of  the  Territory of Oklahoma's exhibit. in the Palace of Agriculture
A section of the Territory of Oklahoma's   exhibit. in the Palace of Mines and Metallurgy
MAIN
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Indian Territory
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri

MAIN PAGE






Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Philippines
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming