Siam's display was a replica of Ben Chama Temple,  in Bangkok. The  66 foot square building  was situated   between the Mexican and Nicaraguan pavilions. It was shaped  like a  Greek cross (four arms of equal length radiating from a center), it  was crowned by a high pitched roof, with a concave ridge pole. This pole is terminated by the pointed ornament, which is seen on the temples of Siam. Each wing of the building had three gables, which rose one above the other, the ridge of each gable being crowned by the ornament mentioned.  The building cost 10,000 dollars, but the entire pavilion and exhibits  totaled 35,000.

Inside, the structure- a large room (and a 14 by 23 foot  room used as offices),  was decorated in green, vermilion and rich gold. There are no posts in the main room; it housed weapons, musical instruments and models of temples from the Royal Museum of Bangkok. the roof being carried on Siamese trusses.  The room also sported  staff decorations in a Siamese elephant motif. One noted portrait  was a painting of the King, Queen and Prince of Siam.

The pavilion was surrounded by a  small but beautiful garden.

Siam is now known as Thailand.

SIAM
Argentine Republic
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Ceylon
China
Cuba
France
Germany
Great Britain
Guatemala
Holland
India
Italy
Japan
Mexico
Nicaragua
Siam
Sweden
United  States (Gov.)

Other Nations

NATIONS PAGE

MAIN PAGE
MAIN
NATIONS
Lee  Gaskins'   AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
                   Web  Design and Art/Illustration   copyrighted  2008