Ceylon (now- Sri Lanka),  was situated north of the Palace of Agriculture, next to  the Great Floral Clock.  The two-story building  resembled  `The Temple of the Tooth,'-  Delada Maligwa.  It was  100 by 84 feet and cost 40,000 dollars to construct.

Inside, the walls were ivory white with yellow draperies. Lotus flower-shaped oil lamps illuminated the interior.  Wall murals illustrating the various lives of Buddha were shown.

A huge paper mache map illustrating the harbor of Colombo  dominated the main  room.  Inside the  many rooms, one could see ebony tables, furniture created from porcupine quills and other hand-carved  artifacts.

The Ceylon building housed a considerable exhibit of  full-sized clay Sinhalese statues  and authentic costumes, including  a  noted collection of gold, silver and  gems.

Visitors could buy lace and tortoise  shell wares.

Adams Peak illustrated cups were used to  serve tea and iced tea to weary visitors (A glass of iced tea and a biscuit cost a dime).  An unfounded rumor had it that iced tea  was invented at this very pavilion, but it is widely thought to have been conceived long before the Fair begun.  No one could argue that iced tea was popularized at the St. Louis Fair.  See  Fair Food Facts and Fallacies for more information.

The Ceylon building did  have a sizeable art display with scenes of the ruined cities of Ceylon, and paintings in the Kandian style, representing weird mythological scenes found on the walls of Buddhist and Hindu Temples.

Surrounding the building are flower beds where many species of East Indian flora have been transplanted.


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Lee  Gaskins'   AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
                   Web  Design and Art/Illustration   copyrighted  2008