Mexico's pavilion occupied a prominent site on Skinker Road (University Boulevard); the  two-story structure was 50x72 feet in dimension, and the grounds about the structure were used for exhibits of the floral productions of the southern Republic. The pavilion was two stories high and was designed after the style of the Spanish Renaissance style. The windows of the lower story were stained glass, while those of the upper story were  made of photographic negatives, showing cathedrals, monuments, palaces, parks and beautiful
bits of scenery in Mexico

There are two entrances, on the north and east, both of which were reached by a considerable flight of easy steps. That on the north side conducted to a loggia, above which was a colonnaded piazza that afforded an extensive view of the Exposition grounds and provided a charming resting place during the warm months.

On the first floor was a patio, an indispensable feature of Spanish architecture, which received light from above and also through numerous stained glass windows, some of which were jeweled and in night-time sparkle with color and reproduce most gorgeous effects. The pavilion also had a public reception room, a very large and handsomely furnished apartment, supplemented by a reading room and telegraph office, and on the wall was a splendid art glass picture of President Diaz.



















The second floor wass occupied by offices of the commission, and consisted of several rooms built around a gallery that looked down upon the court. The windows of the upper floor were set with transparencies showing pictures of cathedrals, palaces, monuments, parks and exquisite bits of Mexican scenery. The roof was highly decorative, surmounted by an eagle over the north facade, and a double tower over which floated the national ensign.

There were twenty-nine members in the Mexican commission, headed by Albino R. Nuncio, Commissioner-General, with Benito Navarro and Juan Renteria as assistants. Cuba's Initial The Republic of Cuba is the latest Representation.




















A very large picture of President Diaz in stained glass occupied a prominent position.

The  country's colors were portrayed in a large ceiling picture. Mutoscope* views of Mexican scenery are presented. In the center of the pavilion was a court, beautified by cacti  and plants common to Mexico

At the south side of the pavilion was  a conservatory, in which   floral plants of the tropics, could live protected by the  St. Louis elements.



*   Mutoscopes were coin-operated early motion picture devices, patented by Herman Casler on November 21, 1894. Like Thomas Edison's Kinetoscope it did not project on a screen, but  provided viewing to only one person at a time.


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Dignitaries posing during Vice president Corral's visit.
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Lee  Gaskins'   AT THE FAIR  The 1904 St. Louis World's   Fair 
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